• WELCOME

    Make yourself at home! Learn more about the Pauline Center for Media Studies and the resources we offer that can help you mindfully respond to the media you take in, engage the media with your faith, and be discerning about your media choices. As religious sisters, we not only consume media, but produce media as well, which gives us a unique perspective on how to engage media with analytical skills and faith.

  • THE LATEST MOVIE REVIEWS

    Perceptive movie reviews explore each film from multiple perspectives--human, artistic, religious, and Catholic. Movie reviews at your fingertips that are both media-literate and faith-friendly can help you choose the best movies for you and your family. Search for a thoughtful review of a recently-released movie, or browse to find a film that is not only artistically well-done, but has a powerful message. 

  • FIND A SPEAKER

    Pauline Center for Media Studies speakers offer film retreats and presentations on a variety of topics related to media literacy, media mindfulness, and faith formation in a digital age. PCMS presentations are for anyone wanting to connect their faith with their everyday, media-saturated lives, from teachers and catechists, to teens, to parents, to parish prayer groups.

  • SPECIAL FEATURE: PRAYING THE MEDIA

    Cinema Novena: the Young Messiah is a unique Scriptural novena that uses the power of film to inspire prayer and reflection on the hidden life of Jesus. The novena concludes with a litany to the Holy Family.  

    Praying the News is a helpful way to reflect on, process, and respond prayerfully to both good news and disturbing events that happen around the world.  

 


 

Sr. Hosea Rupprecht, FSP, welcomes you to the online website for the Pauline Center for Media Studies


Find more movie reviews here.

 



  • Who We Are
  • Media Studies
  • Founders

The Daughters of Saint Paul are an international congregation of women religious who are called, consecrated, and sent to evangelize with the media in the spirit of Saint Paul. Over 2,500 Sisters carry out the Pauline mission in 52 nations, under the name Pauline Books and Media in the English-speaking world.

The Sisters' contemplative Eucharistic prayer, combined with their demanding media mission, nurtures a profound spirit of faith and reflection that they bring to their use of media.  

The Pauline Center for Media Studies (PCMS) is a mission project of the Daughters of St. Paul focused on developing and encouraging media literacy/media mindfulness within culture, education, and faith formation. In media mindfulness, we use critical thinking skills to question the media and discern the values of media messages, engaging them with the Gospel. 

The Pauline Center for Media Studies is located in Los Angeles, CA, and New York, NY. 

As a seminarian, Blessed James Alberione received the inspiration to use the media to evangelize. He founded the Daughters of St. Paul in 1915, with co-foundress Venerable Mother Thecla Merlo. He gave them the mission: “Live the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Way, the Truth and the Life in its entirety, in the spirit of Saint Paul, under the gaze of the Queen of Apostles.”

In 1932, the Pauline Sisters began their mission in the U.S., and in 1952, in Canada. 

  • “We are living in an information-driven society which bombards us indiscriminately with data—all treated as being of equal importance—and which leads to remarkable superficiality in the area of moral discernment. In response, we need to provide an education which teaches critical thinking and encourages the development of mature moral values.”

    — Pope Francis, Joy of the Gospel, #64
  • The most important tool when making meaning from a movie is one your children have been using since they can speak: the question. Many of the concerns Catholic parents have in regard to the media’s influence on their children can be addressed by asking them questions and entering into meaningful conversations about the media they consume..”

    — Sr. Hosea Rupprecht, FSP, How To Watch Movies with Kids—A Values-Based Strategy